Korku Language

korku an endangered language

The Korku language has been heavily influenced by larger hegemonic languages, especially Hindi. This influence affects more than just language, but also the customs and culture of traditional Korku people. A few groups have been more successful in preserving their language, specifically the Potharia Korku (from the Vindhya Mountains). Korku has been classified as an endangered language of India. A census taken in 2001 reported 574,481 people claiming to speak Korku, an un-scheduled language.

 

The Korku language is the language of the Korku tribe of central India. It belongs to the Kolarian or Munda family, isolated in the midst of a Dravidian (Gondi) population. Some alternate names for Korku are: Bondeya, Bopchi, Korki, Kuri, Kurku, Kurku-Ruma, Ramekhera. Korkus are also closely associated with the Nihali people, many of whom have traditionally lived in special quarters of Korku villages.[5] Korku is spoken by approximately 574,000 people, mainly in four districts of southern Madhya Pradesh (Khandwa, Harda, Betul, Hoshangabad) and three districts of northern Maharashtra (Rajura and Korpana tahsils of Chandrapur district, Manikgarh pahad area near Gadchandur in Chandrapur district) (Amravati, Buldana, Akola). Korku is spoken in a declining number of villages and is gradually being replaced by Hindi. The name Korku comes from Koro-ku (-ku is the animate plural), Koro 'person, member of the Korku community' (Zide 2008) Kurku is spoken in the west. Most available data is from the Melghat dialect. Other dialects include the Betul—Hoshangabad dialect. The Lahi sub-dialect of Hoshangabad is notable for its loss of the dual. Muwasi/Mowasi/Mawasi is spoken in the east, such as Chhindwara district of northeastern Maharashtra state. Nouns may have either one of the three genders: masculine, feminine, or neuter. Adjectives are placed before the nouns they qualify. The Korku language uses the Balbodh style of the Devanagari script, which is also used to write the Marathi language. The use of the Korku language has been heavily influenced by larger hegemonic languages, especially Hindi. This influence affects more than just language, but also the customs and culture of traditional Korku people. A few groups have been more successful in preserving their language, specifically the Potharia Korku (from the Vindhya Mountains). Korku has been classified as an endangered language of India. A census taken in 2001 reported 574,481 people claiming to speak Korku, an un-scheduled language.